Posts in Hops

Beers, BBQ and Hops

February 15th, 2017 Posted by Events, Hops, Uncategorized No Comment yet

To help celebrate Nelson Beer Week, we’re inviting you to join us at New Hoplands to enjoy some beers and a BBQ in the sunshine amongst the hops. You’ll also be able to go on a tour of the working hop farm to get a unique insight to the New Zealand hop harvest.

Where: New Hoplands, 362 Tadmor Valley Road, Tapawera

When: Saturday 18 March, 12 – 5pm

Cost: Nothing!

What’s the catch?: We’ve got limited spaces – 20 max – so please RSVP to rsvp@epicbeer.com as soon as possible. R18.

How to get there: New Hoplands is about an hour’s drive from Nelson or 45 minutes from Motueka.

Google Maps

We hope to see you there!

 

 

Build Our Hops a Home!

November 21st, 2016 Posted by Hops, Uncategorized No Comment yet

I’m sure you’ve been closely following the progress of #MyLittleHopGarden, so you’ll know that our precious little (but growing out of control) hop plants need a proper home, with the support structure that they need.

How would you like to build us a hop support frame?

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What we need:
In an ideal world, we would love to turn the soil and plant our hops. The reality is that our Onehunga ‘soil’ mostly comprises of gravel, rusty nuts and bolts and probably an impressive array of chemicals. Our hops are staying in their pots.

Here is what we’d need if we had the “Ideal World” location (image from a brilliant article from YCH Hops on how to grow hops at home – check it out).
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  • We need a frame wide and tall enough to support our hop plants
  • We’ll need to be able to move the frame

If you’d like to design and build our hop support in exchange for a fun day with us plus payment in beer, email your ideas and details through to hopgarden@epicbeer.com.

We look forward to hearing from you.

My Little Hop Garden

November 3rd, 2016 Posted by Hops, News, Uncategorized 1 comment

DAY 115

Hop harvest time is in our sights!

DAY 111

After over a day of persistent rain…

They hops’ aroma has started to change from ultra-green celery like to what we’d expect from hops. We were considering harvesting the hops this week, but we’ll have to wait for them to dry out a bit now.

DAY 108

We clearly didn’t need to pull out the watering can today…

The time to harvest these little beauties is getting closer and closer – we’ll then have to decide what to do with them (putting them in a beer would make most sense, right?). Stay tuned.

DAY 101

It’s really been quite the journey for #MyLittleHopGarden. In spite of a bout of dreadful weather and relentless sou’westers, we’ve finally had a week or so of weather that the hops love: Lots of sun, no wind. It won’t be long until we’ll harvest the hops, we’re looking forward to them developing some sweet hop aromas.

DAY 81

This is a thing of great beauty!

DAY 79

So a lot has happened over the holiday break. It seems that this summer has been quite windy, which as discussed before, does not make hops happy.

Nonetheless, our first hop flowers have developed. Most are still at the “burr” stage, but here are some of the flowers that we have so far:

looking good, eh?

DAY 50

Perhaps the last update until after Christmas. The leading plants have grown about two feet since day 48 – the result of some beautiful sunny days!

DAY 48

Let’s have more of this sunshine! The hops have had a real beating from the wind lately, and they clearly don’t like it. It really is incredible to see how much they grow in one day when the conditions are right.

DAY 47

After a relatively slow growing week (hops hate wind and lack of sunshine), the hops boosted over the sunny weekend. We are going to have to figure out what we’re going to with our scales – these hops are getting up there…

DAY 42

DAY 39

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DAY 37

They are over 6 feet high! The leaves and stems have started to get bigger too. They are clearly liking the fertiliser they were given.

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DAY 35

DAY 33

The “Ed Scale” is introduced to track the growth of the hops. How long will this be sustainable?!

DAY 28

DAY 23


DAY TWENTY 

DAY THIRTEEN 

DAY TWELVE

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DAY NINE

Check it out – our hop plants are boosting! As you can see, they are starting to grow leaves now, so they’re growth is going to be even faster from now on. Photosynthesis is our friend!
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We hope you’re enjoying watching them grow as much as we are.

DAY SEVEN

DAY SIX

And they’re off! It’s pretty cool to see the difference that one day makes. All four hop plants have now emerged!

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Hop plant 1

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Hop plant 2

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Hop plant 3

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Hop plant 4

 


DAY FIVE

The heavy rain showers and sunny weekend clearly paid off for our hops. Check it out – three of the four plants have sprouted!

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A few people have asked what we’re feeding them. They are growing in roses mix, which is meant to be best for growing hops in pots. Now that they’ve sprouted they’ll grow like crazy, so we’ll have to sort out their new home under a support structure. We may be looking for some help with building this – stay tuned.



DAY TWO

No watering required – plenty of fresh Auckland cloud juice today.

No watering required today!


DAY ONE

We’ve got our hands on some New Zealand hop rhizomes! We’re not sure of the variety yet, we’ll let you know as soon as we find out. We’ll be following their progress and keep posting updates for you here.

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At this stage, we’ve just put the rhizomes into pots in a sunny sheltered spot. We’ll build a frame to suspend the hop bines in a spot that gets optimal sunlight.

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Stay tuned!


US Hop Harvest 2016 – What actually happens.

September 6th, 2016 Posted by Hops, News, Uncategorized 1 comment

One question I was asked recently is what do you do while you are in Yakima during hop harvest?

The short answer is I visit hop farms and meet with the hop growers and select my hops for the year.

This year I am visiting the following hop farms, from which I selected some of my varieties from last year’s harvest.

Van Horn FarmsColumbus

Black Star Farms – Mosaic

C&C FarmsCentennial

Perrault Farms – to visit the hop breeding plot.

What does a hop farm visit entail?

It is a chance to meet up with the hop farmer and have a walk amongst the bines to see how they are looking, have a chat about how things are going for the current harvest and how the weather and growing season has gone. We’ll discuss what this means for yields and quality of this seasons hops. It is also a chance to ask about what the future holds; What varieties will be planted out next season, what varieties might be reduced.

Luke in the hopsAfter a walk through the hops and rubbing and smelling them, I’ll go through the processing plant where you get to see the harvested bines arriving. The bines are hooked up and run through the pickers that strip off all the delicate hop flowers. The flowers are separated from the leaves and stalks and conveyed to the drying room. The drying room receives the hops onto a big bed with a false floor that hot air is pushed up through. After 6-8 hours, the hops are dried then moved on to get baled up. The bales are all checked for temperature and moisture (if bales contain too much moisture, things can get ugly – fire ugly) then the bales are loaded onto trucks.

Hop Bales On TruckThe truck with hop bales are delivered to YCH Hops. After being checked and stored a brewers cut will be taken from the lot that has arrived from the farm.

After the farm visits there will be an afternoon of hop selection where several lots for each variety are presented. The samples are taken from the bales; The brewers cuts. After ranking and selecting the lot I want, its time for a beer.

Since hop harvest only runs for a few weeks of the year, you can guarantee you will bump into many brewers while you are in the area. It is always fun to have a beer with the other like minded brewers who have travelled to this special spot on the planet to oversee the harvesting of the magical flowers that gift our beery creations with their aromatic essence.

It is a fun time, meeting growers, seeing the hops, bumping into brewing friends, and having a couple pints. I look forward to going each year. Can’t wait to get there again soon.

Epic + Hops = First, Best, Most, Only, Greatest and Supreme.

August 30th, 2016 Posted by Hops, News, Uncategorized 1 comment

Luke in the hopsWhen people think about beer from Epic, the first thing that jumps to mind is big hoppy beers. They would be right as we not only brew with massive amounts of hops, but also visit the hop fields and know the hop farmers to get the best hops in the world. Not many brewers in New Zealand do this locally, and none visit the hop farmers on a yearly basis in the US.

Here are some fun facts as to why HOPS = EPIC BEER.

Epic Brewing Company used the MOST AROMA HOPS in the last 10 years, more than any other brewery in New Zealand.

Epic Brewing Company is the LARGEST IMPORTER of US hops to New Zealand over the last 10 years.

Epic Pale Ale was the FIRST American style Pale Ale to be released in New Zealand in 2006.

Epic Pale Ale won SUPREME CHAMPION beer at the 2006 NZ beer Awards on the eve of its official release.

This beer changed the face of craft beer in New Zealand.

Epic Pale Ale is made with US grown Cascade hops, the NUMBER ONE aroma hop in the world.

Best IPA 2016Epic Armageddon IPA is the MOST awarded IPA in New Zealand read this.

Epic Armageddon IPA was the FIRST commercially bottled American style IPA brewed in New Zealand.

Epic Hop Zombie was the FIRST Double IPA released in New Zealand.

The ONLY New Zealand brewer to visit Yakima every year for hop harvest and visit the hop farmers.

When I started out brewing, it was obvious that I was never going to be the BIGGEST, but I could strive to be THE BEST. To be the best, it was logical to use the best ingredients I could find for the best beer you want to make. Sometimes you have to search the whole globe to find the best. Best ale malt from England, best Pilsner malt from Germany, best hops for American IPA’s from Yakima.

Many people have asked me why I don’t use all New Zealand hops and all New Zealand malts. For some people this is hard to hear, but sometimes those New Zealand ingredients aren’t the best for the styles of beer I like to make. Other times they are the best for the flavours I want, but not every time.


I love the aromas and flavours that come from the hops grown in the Yakima valley. I love brewing with these hops, and love the beers that these hops make. This is why I make such an effort each year to fly to the other side of the Pacific Ocean, to find the best of what they have, and bring it back home to New Zealand to brew with.

Guess what? It isn’t just me that gets the joy of drinking the beers I brew with these gloriously aromatic hops. You to can buy these beers. It’s a beautiful thing.

US Hop Harvest 2016 – The Countdown Starts Now

August 24th, 2016 Posted by Hops, News, Uncategorized No Comment yet

It is that time of the year again, and I am finalizing plans and counting down days to my trip to Yakima, USA. I am visiting because it is the time of the year that they harvest the hops.

Yakima is where the majority of hops are grown in the USA. Every year since 2012 I have traveled to Yakima at hop harvest time, to visit hop farms, and meet hop growers, but mostly to have the opportunity (which is the ultimate privilege) to be able to select the hop I want. This will be my fifth consecutive season at hop harvest in Yakima.

luke smelling hopsWhat does hop selection mean? It is that I am presented with several lots of hops (of approximately similar sizes, depending on variety and the quantity I have contract for that variety). I am presented with 6 to 8 different samples from potentially the same number of farms. I take these hops and rub them in my hands to heat up the hop oils and the smell the aromas they produce. I compare them all, making notes, and then rank them, and select my favourite.

Why do I think US grown hops are good? It probably goes back to my formative days of drinking craft beer (early 1990’s). When I first discovered it, and tasted flavours I had never had before in beer. Since that time and that beer(s) was in the US and used US grown hops to flavour it, I have always been drawn to these characters as favourites. Beer is so situational.

I first imported hops from Hopunion in 1997 and have been travelling to the US every year since, sometimes twice a year. Therefore much of my inspiration and influence has come from the West Coast of the USA when it comes to beer styles, beer flavours, hop varieties, and hopping rates.

Luke Hops Are FoodYes, I like hops. You could say I am obsessed with hops. I want to find out as much as I can about hops and the hops I brew with. I want to meet the people that grow the hops I buy. I want to see the plant the my hops come from and where those plants grow. Since these hops are grown in Yakima I need to hop on a plane and travel 7000 miles to get what I want, to make the best beer I can. So far this has seemed to have paid off.